Welcome to Perfomance Development Strategies.



We partner with our clients to help them determine where they want to go and what results they want to achieve.  Then we help you develop the action plan to make it happen.  We help our clients develop and manage strategic, cultural, and structural changes within their organizations. By working together, we can provide personalized processes and support materials that help turn goals into reality. We help organizations align their plan, people, and systems in order to gain a competitive edge.
We facilitate and coordinate programs to develop your company's human capital, focusing on attitude development, human relations, skill development, and goal setting.

 

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Customer Service and Customer Loyalty


The mastery of customer service can mean the difference between success and failure. The corporate trend of raising customer service is a business necessity. Customers are more willing to forgive a product failure than a service failure by a ratio of 5 to 1. If customer retention is important, then improving customer service must be the tactic. Unfortunately in many companies, the customer has become a low priority. When people are not treated according to their expectation, they will take their business elsewhere. What’s more, they relay their bad experience to ten or more other people. The question then becomes not whether to improve your companies service standard, but how?

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What is
coaching? Is it right for you?

Have you ever felt like you are navigating through your professional life alone? If you are like most executives and small business owners the answer is yes. In a corporation, the higher up the ladder you go the harder it is to find someone to discuss dreams, goals, actions, and success strategy. This is also true of the small business owner. Having a coach is like having a needed connection that cannot be made with others. For example:

Your spouse may listen but the dynamics of marriage relationship may cloud perspective and objectivity.

Your friends want to be helpful but they don’t have the training to identify real issues and they don’t have the time commitment.

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PD Strategies Blog

Performance and Development Strategies Blog is the informational place to get timely and purposeful articles on the issues that concern you most.

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DON’T SET PEOPLE UP TO FAIL

Posted by on in Competencies and Strengths
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Most small to mid-size businesses are too busy growing to spend time growing their people. This can be a serious mistake. If you simply let people learn on the fly and promote them when needed, then you are setting them up to fail. This is so prevalent that a book called the Peter Principle was written about this phenomenon.

In 1969, Lawrence Peter wrote a humorous book titled The Peter Principle in which he postulated that, in a hierarchy people tend to be promoted to the level of their incompetence. He noted that although this is not planned it is the unintended consequence. Companies make a flawed assumption that because the employee was a great individual performer in the previous job that he or she will adapt and become a leader of the team. Inevitably, according to the Peter Principle, the person ends up being promoted to a job where they are no longer competent. This is referred to as the "level of incompetence". The employee has no chance of further promotion, thus reaching his or her career's ceiling in an organization.

We can see examples of The Peter Principle in many of our businesses. It is most commonly found in the selection and promotion of managers. Let’s use an example. Jane is a very highly performing accountant. She meets deadlines and delivers good and accurate reports for management. She is the right-hand person to the accounting manager. One day the accounting manager leaves the company for another job and management decides to promote Jane to the accounting manager position. Was this the right decision? Let’s find out.

          What duties was Jane paid to do as an accountant?

          What duties is Jane now paid to do as accounting manager?

Nothing is wrong with promoting Jane. In fact, we would encourage it. However, if you do nothing more to assist Jane then you are setting her up for failure. The skills that Jane used to perform as an accountant are different than those needed in her new role as manager.

This skill curve below illustrates this point.

 

skillscurve2

 

 

As we can see here, in order to be effective as an individual performer you must utilize about 90% technical expertise with only 10% people skills.

However, at the next level in the organizational structure, the supervisory level, the curve makes its most dramatic shift, and the necessary knowledge and skills you now need to be effective on the job is about half and half. You still need a great deal of job knowledge—to train, to substitute, etc.; but, now your Number 1 responsibility is developing other people—to develop other high performing workers, to teach, to lead, and to manage.

Then, as you can see from the shift in the upper levels, the higher you go in the corporate ladder, the less you need technical skills, and the more you need good, effective management and human relations skills. At the management levels, more behavioral and management skills are required for your success.

Are you promoting and hoping for success? What do you need to do differently?

Do you need help developing skills for leadership?

Contact us to learn more

or call 914-953-4458.

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Guest Tuesday, 18 December 2018

Testimonial


Grant has worked with us at MAS to provide expert strategic planning knowledge and direction, effective goal setting and team development. I highly recommend his services to anyone who is looking to grow, organize or even redefine their business growth goals. Marshall that he had the greatest sales increase in 2012 30%

December 6, 2012, ~ Lisa Schmid and Marshall Marinace

 


 

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