PD Strategies Blog

Performance and Development Strategies Blog is the informational place to get timely and purposeful articles on the issues that concern you most.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.

THE NATURE OF CHANGE

Posted by on in Fear of Change
  • Font size: Larger Smaller
  • Hits: 154
  • 0 Comments

Have you thought about how fast change is happening? Change is constant and a person who can manage or get in front of change will survive and thrive. The nature of change was brought home to me as I was reading account of how current business owners had spent the last 10 years. There were drastic differences within just the last 10 years.

If these business owners did not make the changes, they made they might be out of business.

The expression “If it’s not broke don’t fix it” could more appropriately be stated “If it is not broken yet it soon will be.”

You can wait for change to force you to do something and then react. But that is not the best option. The best option is to predict and get in front of change. These are some of the things you should you should be doing proactively:

1.        Make sure you know what business you are in. Whether you are in real estate, construction and contracting, graphic design, or consulting you must define what you provide to the customer. For example, Kodak should have realized that it was not in the film business but in the image and impression sharing business. In real estate are you selling houses or assisting buyers in improving their lives?

2.        Get in front of change.   The best way to this it to look into the future, understand the trends and how they affect your business and move yourself into them. One example may be the use of webinars vs. in person meetings. While arguments can be made about current quality of delivery, getting your arms around it and having a strategy to shift will keep you leading. There was a time when a digital camera was not an alternative to high quality film but by not leading that new technology, Kodak failed.

3.        Assess your business. Take inventory of where you have strengths in the market as well as where you are weak and vulnerable. With that information look into the future to assess not just opportunities in your industry but also dangers and threats on the horizon. If you have done good business in an area where you know you are weak and you see new external threats on the horizon you may want to move away from that offering. On the other hand, look at new opportunities where you can exploit your strengths.

4.        How do you communicate and market. The method and costs of marketing and communication have already changed drastically. Today, who looks to find something in the Yellow Pages? You need to embrace the new media. However, I caution you to evaluate and create a strategy first. Don’t simply follow the latest shiny new media application.

5.        Understand generational differences. Different generations have different needs, communicate differently, and engage with your business differently. If you are doing well serving one generation, learn why. Are the things that engage that generation of no value to the next generation? Failure to understand that dynamic will result in increasingly lost revenue.

GenY

These steps are great starting points. If you have not looked at your business in the last three years it should be done now. What will you change? It is vital to your future success.

Are you ready to create your own change?

Contact us to learn more

or call 914-953-4458.

Comments

  • No comments made yet. Be the first to submit a comment

Leave your comment

Guest Monday, 22 July 2019

Testimonial


“When I started my company I thought that the world would beat a path to my door because of my technical skills.  I figured that once I got in front of someone it would be apparent that I’m a genius and they would hire me right away.  It didn’t work out that way and it didn’t take long to realize that I would need to learn to be a sales person.  I engaged Grant and we worked together for several months and I have to say that he really helped.  Before I worked with Grant I read books and attended seminars that all focused on specific sales techniques – what to do or say during a sales call and during the sales process.  All of them treat the sales call as the end all and be all – get the sale, hand it off, and get out.  This doesn’t help me since once I get a client I need to build the relationship and work with that person on a day-to-day basis.  With Grant’s approach I understand the sales process much better, I’m more goals oriented, I know how to measure my sales activity, and – most importantly – I feel more comfortable in my role as a sales person.  My approach to sales is now more aligned with the way I want to run my business and with my values as a person.

The study materials I received from Grant are very good. They require reading, listening, and writing so the information is reinforced.  Grant does not rely on the study materials, however.  Our weekly meetings were open to whatever I wished to discuss and I feel that Grant’s advice was very insightful.

Even though we haven’t worked together in a few months I still use the study materials and Grant still reaches out to me.” June 30, 2011

Antonio Ciampa, hired Grant as a Business Consultant in 2009, and hired Grant more than once


 

Home  |  About Us Business Perfomance  |  Leadership and Coaching  |  Blog  |  Contact us

Copyright© 2016  Performance Development Strategies, LLC. 
P: 914-953-4458   E: grant@pdstrategies.com

Powered By RAC Creative Services